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The system of growing and changing is the living system is families. The adaptation of these changes is done by the family, they are also viable and threatened by the individual member. The therapeutic approach of the structured family recognizes the strength that family possess and it also makes an attempt to move the family beyond the pattern of dysfunctionality while having an interaction. The aim of the paper is to outline the application of structural family therapy and its approach. Furthermore, it will analyse the key theory of the structural family therapy model and its goals, development, and change in the process. Salvador Minuchin theory of structural family therapy is been explained further. Stanton and Todd and his explanation of family therapy is been discussed further.

Structural Family Therapy

Family therapy is a kind of psychological counselling that will help the members of the family to resolve the conflict and improve communication. One of the most popular forms of therapy is the structural family therapy (AIPC, 2022). Focusing on understanding the pattern in the behaviour is the most important part of this therapy. It is also extremely useful in solving the clashes which take place between the family members. This has been popular over the last few decades, the approach was developed by Salvador Minuchin, based on strength and oriented towards the outcomes for the treatment of modality. One of the primary jobs of the therapist is to mobilize and locate strengths that are underutilized. This in turn helps the family to outgrow the patterns which are constraining interaction, this implies the activation of their own resources (Tadros et al., 2019). 
 

Understanding the relationships existent in a particular family system in order to change them was the therapeutic goal of Salvador Minuchin 's structural model. It aims to enhance the family members' interactions and behaviours in order to achieve this, additionally, by supposing the protagonist to be a child or teenager (Gold, 2019).
 

One of the tenets of Minuchin's theoretical framework is that the family is a dynamic, ever-evolving entity. The therapist must pay attention to more than just how that group of people interacts. Additionally, they need to comprehend the adjustments, look back on the past, and ponder the actions that shaped the scenario's current state (Pan & Hamilton, 2018).
 

One must also realize that each member of the family receives a feeling of identity from the group as a whole. Additionally, these encounters force each participant to adopt a side in contests of power, dominance, and submission and last, every adolescent has a natural yearning for individuation and separation. Identifying and addressing family issues is the aim. These difficulties could be behavioural, psychological, or emotional. Family systems theory is the foundation of many methods of family therapy.
 

The following must be taken into consideration by the therapist when diagnosing a child's or teen's family structure: Limits, these subsystems, The family's evolutionary process, Coalitions and alliances inside the family, The structure of power, The level of adaptability to change, Sources of stress and assistance (Vigerland et al., 2016).
 

The structural family therapy approach is Salvador Minuchin's most important contribution. Structural family therapy works upon a concept which is connected with uncovering and understanding pattern or behaviour which is connected with the family interactions. Understanding the interaction in between the family members plays a major role in this therapy. This theory sometimes proves highly beneficial in understating the sudden changes in the behaviour of the children. He wished to comprehend more fully the impact of both internal and external conditioning variables. This is due to the fact that they frequently condition this tiny version of every culture. Short-term relief from the issues or symptoms that led to the referral or request for help is the goal of structural family therapy. However, the main objective of this family therapy is to support the family in creating interactional patterns that will support future family functioning that is healthier and happier (Williams et al., 2016).
 

This type of therapy will put its main effort into assisting the family in creating a new, "flexible structure." They will be able to handle or lessen current issues, change, and life transitions in this way (such as adolescence, illness, unemployment, or bereavement) (Alexander & Robbins, 2019). This could entail helping co-parents collaborate efficiently or comprehend the need to modify their parenting approach to account for their child's developmental progress, for instance change in the patterns of eliciting discriminative stimuli that family members emanate and which "trigger" their behaviour is one way by which change can take place in family therapy. First-order change is a change that affects only behaviour, not the system's rules of operation. Compared to second-order alterations, these changes are thought to be more transient and less long-lasting. For instance, John and Mary frequently argue (Yagishita, 2019).
 

In order to treat drug addicts and their families, Stanton and Todd investigated the efficiency of structural family therapy. They contrasted structured family therapy with two alternative therapies (Halloran, 2016). They discovered that the positive improvement was more than twice as great as what was accomplished under the other circumstances. Particularly, these scholars discovered that post-treatment hook households exhibited healthier subsystem boundaries. At the follow-up, these outcomes remained consistent. In a different study, psychodynamic child therapy structural family therapy, and a control condition were all used in dealing of 69 Hispanic schoolboys. The researchers such as Szapocznik, Scopetta, Murray, Hewis, Cohen, Rio, Kurtines and Rivas-Vazquez, Posada, and (1998) discovered that the effectiveness of both therapy options in easing behavioural and cognitive issues was virtually the same. The key distinction was that structural family therapy improved family functioning while pick up the check the child alone led to a decline in family working. As structural family therapy gained acceptance in the family therapy community, it started to be taught to therapists in training (Shah et al., 2019).
 

The efficiency of this paradigm as a training tool has since been the subject of studies. Zaken-Greenberg and Neimeyer discovered, for instance, that trainees in structural family therapy demonstrated greater levels of theoretical and decision-making skills than the controller group in their study on the efficacy of the training. Prior research also demonstrated the efficacy of this strategy for educating future family therapists (Jenkin & Winter, 2020).
 

Minuchin's research was interesting in that it showed no improvement in the disengaged families following treatment. Although this learning had numerous methodological issues, such as small sample size and the absence of a control group, it did offer the first proof that structural family therapy was, in fact, somewhat successful. Research switched in the 1970s to focus on psychosomatic families. The published research showed that anorexic, asthmatic, and diabetic subjects had very good treatment outcomes (McHale et al., 2015). 86 percent of anorexics recovered, according to data from Minuchin. Additionally, they discovered that 88% of those with labile diabetes and 82% of people with asthma healed. The best outcomes were achieved by structural family therapy, according to the authors' comparison of this study to trials that used alternative types of treatment. These results appeared to support the notion that structural family therapy was a superior intervention that was effective (Hughes et al., 2017).
 

In light of the above discussion, it can be concluded that family therapy is a kind of psychological counselling that will help the members of the family to resolve the conflict and improve communication. This has been popular over the last few decades. Structural family therapy was not only become popular but also it proved as most effective theory. Family settings and subsystem are the two major components of the theory (Tadros et al., 2019). This theory works well in those families in which children are showing fluctuation or abnormal behaviour. This theory found very useful in identifying the causes behind poor mental health of the children who are part of families. One of the most popular forms of therapy is the structural family therapy. The approach was developed by Salvador Minuchin, based on strength and oriented towards the outcomes for the treatment of modality. One of the primary jobs of the therapist is to mobilize and locate strengths that are underutilized. This in turn helps the family to outgrow the patterns which are constraining interaction, this implies the activization of their own resources (Williams et al., 2016).
 

First off, as Colapinto (1991) notes, the majority of studies on this model have focused on children and adolescents, and there is a dearth of data demonstrating this model's efficacy with an adult population. In the 1960s, while helping troubled boys and their families, Minuchin conducted the first study of structural family therapy. He examined eleven families and discovered that, on average, between 50% and 55% of the cases improved with treatment.
 

Short-term relief from the issues or symptoms that led to the referral or request for help is the goal of family therapy which is structured. However, the main objective of this family healing is to support the family in creating interactional patterns that will support future family functioning that is healthier and happier (Walsh, F. 2016).
 

In conclusion, Minuchin’s research could not prove successful and a lot of problems were found in the method and process of this research. The approach of Structural family therapy is found useful in understanding the psychology of the children of the families. It is also found that finding out the interactional pattern is such a useful technique which is ultimately helpful in solving the complex behaviour of the persons (Walsh, F. 2016).
 
References
 
AIPC. (2022). Bachelor of Counselling Degree | Online Course | AIPC. Www.aipc.net.au. https://www.aipc.net.au/courses/bachelor-of-counselling
 
 
Alexander, J. F., & Robbins, M. (2019). Functional Family Therapy. Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy, 1(1), 1232–1240. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_161
 
 
Gold, J. M. (2019). Intervening for Stepfamily Success: One Case, Multiple Perspectives. In Google Books. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.in/books?hl=en&lr=&id=N9yVDwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA49&dq=Salvador+Minuchin+%27s+structural+model.+It+aims+to+enhance+the+family+members%27+interactions+and+behaviors+in+&ots=Uj7Xlq3dQJ&sig=wABeVLPalkIsfSIyw4m3gBRha5A&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
 
 
Halloran, F. (2016). The National Joker: Abraham Lincoln and the Politics of Satire by Todd Nathan Thompson. Journal of Southern History, 82(4), 942–943. https://doi.org/10.1353/soh.2016.0280
 
 
Hughes, E. K., Burton, C., Le Grange, D., & Sawyer, S. M. (2017). The Participation of Mothers, Fathers, and Siblings in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 47(sup1), S456–S466. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2017.1390756
 
 
Jenkin, A. C., & Winter, D. A. (2020). Exploration of Ethical Construing in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students: An Adaptation of Repertory Grid Technique. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 1(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/10720537.2020.1805830
 
 
McHale, J. P., Salman-Engin, S., & Coovert, M. D. (2015). Improvements in Unmarried African American Parents’ Rapport, Communication, and Problem-Solving Following a Prenatal Coparenting Intervention. Family Process, 54(4), 619–629. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12147
 
 
Pan, X., & Hamilton, A. F. de C. (2018). Why and how to use virtual reality to study human social interaction: The challenges of exploring a new research landscape. British Journal of Psychology, 109(3), 395–417. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12290
 
 
Shah, K., Ramos-Garcia, M., Bhavsar, J., & Lehrer, P. (2019). Mind-body treatments of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms: An updated meta-analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1(1), 103462. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2019.103462
 
 
Tadros, E., Fye, J. M., McCrone, C. L., & Finney, N. (2019). Incorporating Multicultural Couple and Family Therapy Into Incarcerated Settings. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 63(4), 641–658. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X18823442
 
 
Vigerland, S., Ljótsson, B., Thulin, U., Öst, L.-G., Andersson, G., & Serlachius, E. (2016). Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for children with anxiety disorders: A randomised controlled trial. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 76(1), 47–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.11.006
 
 
Walsh, F. (2016). Applying a Family Resilience Framework in Training, Practice, and Research: Mastering the Art of the Possible. Family Process, 55(4), 616–632. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12260
 
 
Williams, N. D., Foye, A., & Lewis, F. (2016). Applying Structural Family Therapy in the Changing Context of the Modern African American Single Mother. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 28(1), 30–47. https://doi.org/10.1080/08952833.2015.1130547
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